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Nobody’s Home: Modern Southern Folklore is an online anthology of nonfiction works about beliefs, myths, and narratives in Southern culture over the last fifty years, in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.  The project, created in 2020 by writer-editor Foster Dickson, collects personal essays, memoirs, short articles, opinion pieces, and contemplative works about the ideas, experiences, and assumptions that have shaped life below the old Mason-Dixon Line since 1970. 

The anthology’s initial compilation was completed between October 2020 and September 2021. However, its offerings will continue to grow and evolve. By the end of 2021, a lesson plan will be provided for each of the forty-four essays published here. Submissions of book reviews and interviews will continue to be considered, and an open-submissions period for creative nonfiction works will begin in April 2022. For those writers who may still be interested in submitting, please read the submission guidelines.

To browse and read the anthology’s works, visit the Index page. Or to learn more about the project, you can read the editor’s intro, “Myths are the truths we live by,” or his outro, “There was never one South.” You can also read posts on the editor’s blog here or on Medium, like the project’s Facebook page, or follow on Twitter.

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What is this?

Nobody’s Home is an online anthology of creative-nonfiction works about the prevailing beliefs, myths, and narratives that have driven Southern culture over the last fifty years, in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The publication collects personal essays, memoirs, and contemplative pieces about the ideas, experiences, and assumptions that have shaped life below the […]

How do I submit?

Submissions to Nobody’s Home should be accessible to a general audience with a reasonable education level, and may contain 1,000 to 5,000 words. Facts that are included in the work, such as direct quotes, statistics, or polling, should include sources to aid the editor in evaluating the work. The editor favors works that have humanity […]